Low Dose Naltrexone

Wayne Bonlie, MD -  - Family Medicine

Wayne Bonlie, MD

Family Medicine located in Timonium, MD

If you live with frequent illnesses or chronic infections and feel like you never fully recover from an illness before you contract another one, you may have a compromised immune system. At his private practice in Timonium, Maryland, Wayne Bonlie, MD, offers low-dose naltrexone to treat immune system dysfunction. If you’re concerned about your immune system and are tired of always feeling run down, call Dr. Bonlie or make an appointment online today.

Low Dose Naltrexone Q & A

What is low-dose naltrexone?

Naltrexone is best known as a medication for opioid dependency. However, when provided in low doses of less than 10mg per day, the medicine improves immune system functionality and reduces the symptoms of chronic conditions by boosting endorphin levels. Your endorphins minimize pain, improve your mood, and enhance your immune system function.

What are signs of immune system dysfunction?

Your immune system is responsible for protecting your body from threats such as viruses, bacteria, and other causes of infection. When your immune system doesn’t function correctly, it either fails to protect you from disease or interprets cells in your body as threats and attacks itself.

For example, if you have a weak or compromised immune system, you may feel like you’re always ill, run down, or fatigued. You might live with chronic body aches and feel depressed or anxious.

Autoimmune diseases are conditions in which your body mistakenly interprets cells in your body as a threat. Common autoimmune disorders include:

  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Grave’s disease and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis
  • Lupus
  • Rheumatoid arthritis

Autoimmune diseases cause a wide range of disruptive symptoms and interfere with your overall wellness.

How does low-dose naltrexone work?

Medical and pharmaceutical research, as well as anecdotal discoveries by medical providers like Dr. Bonlie, uncover new uses for medicines all the time. Many drugs that you know for one use were initially developed for something else altogether. For example, Botox® was originally developed to reduce eye twitches and Viagra® was a blood pressure medication.

Low-dose naltrexone is no different. As medical researchers learn more about the way opioid receptors work and how they affect your overall body function, they uncover new uses for opioid receptor blockers like naltrexone. For example, research shows that when you take a low-dose of naltrexone at night, it blocks your opioid receptors for approximately two hours. That is enough to boost the production of the elements that contribute to your immune system, including endorphins and enkephalins.

Results of low-dose naltrexone vary between patients. However, Dr. Bonlie provides extensive testing and works with a reliable compounding pharmacy to provide you with the precise dose that should improve your health.

To learn more about low-dose naltrexone, call Dr. Bonlie today or make an appointment online.